Introducing programmatic builds on Heroku

Today, we are announcing an important addition to the Heroku Platform API: The /apps/:app/builds endpoint. This endpoint exposes the Heroku slug compilation process as a simple API primitive. You can use the endpoint to turn any publicly hosted source-tarball into a slug running on a Heroku app in seconds.

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The Heroku HTTP API Toolchain

Today we’re open sourcing the toolchain Heroku uses to design, document, and consume our HTTP APIs. We hope this shows how Heroku thinks about APIs and gives you new tools to create your own.

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Heroku Platform API now GA

Today, we’re happy to announce General Availability of the Heroku Platform API. Heroku is a platform built by developers, for developers. As developers, we understand the utility of APIs and the power APIs give to speed up and script error-prone manual processes or to combine other services with Heroku into new and exciting products. With the Platform API, you now have a fully documented and supported way to instrument and automate Heroku.

Platform API

Designing and implementing this API has been an important process for Heroku internally: It has forced us rethink how different platform components are factored and how they should be exposed in a clean and coherent manner. We are already using the Platform API heavily for projects at Heroku, and the new API is superseding and replacing the spread of private and semi-public APIs that have made Heroku work so far.

Because platform functionality is now available in a single API that has good documentation and updated client libraries, Heroku can create better products and services, faster. By making the API public, we want to give Heroku customers, users, and partners the same opportunity.

Readers new to the Plaform API can jump straight to the quickstart to get started.

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Introducing Heroku Connect: Connecting Clouds and Customers

Today we are announcing the general availability of Salesforce1 Heroku Connect. This new Heroku product is a synchronization service, conceptually similar to Dropbox or iCloud, that synchronizes data between a Salesforce deployment and a Heroku Postgres database. By bringing together the data layers of the Force.com and Heroku platforms--and thus allowing the same data to be seamlessly reflected in each cloud’s native database--you can use the capabilities of each platform together in a single application, without having to translate or otherwise integrate between them.

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Incident Response at Heroku

As a service provider, when things go wrong you try to get them fixed as quickly as possible. In addition to technical troubleshooting, there’s a lot of coordination and communication that needs to happen in resolving issues with systems like Heroku’s.

At Heroku we’ve codified our practices around these aspects into an incident response framework. Whether you’re just interested in how incident response works at Heroku, or looking to adopt and apply some of these practices for yourself, we hope you find this inside look helpful.

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