This blog post is adapted from a talk given by Stella Cotton at RailsConf 2018 titled "So You’ve Got Yourself a Kafka."

In recent years, designing software as a collection of services, rather than a single, monolithic codebase, has become a popular way to build applications. In this post, we'll learn the basics of Kafka and how its event-driven process can be used to power your Rails services. We’ll also talk about practical considerations and operational challenges that your event-driven Rails services might face around monitoring and scaling.

What is Kafka?

Suppose you want to know more information about how your users are engaged on your platform: the pages they...


ruby-2

The Ruby committers have again continued their annual holiday tradition of gifting us a new Ruby version: Ruby 2.6 was released today, including the long awaited Just-In-Time (JIT) compiler that the Ruby team has been working on for more than a year.

Just-In-Time compilation requires Ruby to spin up a compiler process on startup, and we're proud to say that this feature is supported today on Heroku thanks to the diligent efforts of our very own Richard Schneeman. We'd also like to thank fellow Herokai Nobuyoshi Nakada for his effort making sure the new JIT works well with all of the officially supported compilers: GCC, Clang and Microsoft Visual C++.

Using Ruby 2.6 on Heroku

...


Building a SaaS product, a system to handle sensor data from an internet-connected thermostat or car, or an e-commerce store often requires handling a large stream of product usage data, or events. Managing event streams lets you view, in near real-time, how users are interacting with your SaaS app or the products on your e-commerce store; this is interesting because it lets you spot anomalies and get immediate data-driven feedback on new features. While this type of stream visualization is useful to a point, pushing events into a data warehouse lets you ask deeper questions using SQL.

In this post, we’ll show you how to build a system using Apache Kafka on Heroku to manage and visualize...


Rails applications that use ActiveRecord objects in their cache may experience an issue where the entries cannot be invalidated if all of these conditions are true:

  1. They are using Rails 5.2+
  2. They have configured config.active_record.cache_versioning = true
  3. They are using a cache that is not maintained by Rails, such as dalli_store (2.7.8 or prior)

In this post, we discuss the background to a change in the way that cache keys work with Rails, why this change introduced an API incompatibility with 3rd party cache stores, and finally how you can find out if your app is at risk and how to fix it.

Even if you're not at Rails 5.2 yet, you'll likely get there one day. It's...


Seccomp (short for security computing mode) is a useful feature provided by the Linux kernel since 2.6.12 and is used to control the syscalls made by a process. Seccomp has been implemented by numerous projects such as Docker, Android, OpenSSH and Firefox to name a few.

In this blog post, I am going to show you how you can implement your own seccomp filters, at runtime, for a Go binary on your Dyno.

Why Use Seccomp Filters?

By default, when you run a process on your Dyno, it is limited by which syscalls it can make because the Dyno has been implemented with a restricted set of seccomp filters. This means, for example, that your process has access to syscalls A,B and C and not H and J...


Browse the archives for engineering or all blogs Subscribe to the RSS feed for engineering or all blogs.