Postgres 9.5 General Availability

Starting today, Postgres 9.5 is now the new default version for all new Heroku Postgres databases. We’ve had hundreds of customers using early beta versions of 9.5 and the feedback has been positive. For many customers, the new UPSERT functionality was the last feature that prevented many of them from moving from other relational databases to Postgres. The engineering staff at Heroku and the Postgres community at large has spent years bringing UPSERT to fruition and the customer feedback is a testament to that hard work. If you want to try out the new version, getting it is as simple as provisioning a new database:

$ heroku addons:create heroku-postgresql -a sushi
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Container-Ready Rails 5

Rails 5 will be the easiest release ever to get running on Heroku. You can get it going in just five lines:

$ rails new myapp -d postgresql
$ cd myapp
$ git init . ; git add . ; git commit -m first
$ heroku create
$ git push heroku master

These five lines (and a view or two) are all you need to get a Rails 5 app working on Heroku — there are no special gems you need to install, or flags you must toggle. Let's take a peek under the hood, and explore the interfaces baked right into Rails 5 that make it easy to deploy your app on any modern container-based platform.

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Announcing Heroku Kafka Early Access

Today we are happy to announce early access to Heroku Kafka. We think Kafka is interesting and exciting because it provides a powerful and scalable set of primitives for reasoning about, building, and scaling systems that can handle high volumes and velocities of data. Heroku Kafka makes Kafka more accessible, reliable, and easy to integrate into your applications.

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Session Affinity now Generally Available

Today we are announcing that Session Affinity routing is now generally available as a fully supported part of the Heroku Platform. When Session Affinity is enabled for an app, requests from a given browser will always be routed to the same Dyno. Under the hood, the Heroku Router will add a cookie to all incoming requests from new clients; this cookie allows subsequent requests from that client to return to the same Dyno. With specific clients bound to specific Dynos, apps that depend on ‘sticky sessions’ can still take advantage of Heroku’s flexible scaling.

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Bootstrapping Your Microservices Architecture with JHipster and Spring

jhipster-springboot-heroku-01 (1)

Julien Dubois is the lead developer of JHipster, a Yeoman generator for Spring and AngularJS applications. Julien’s here to show how you can use a generator like JHipster to address some of the design concerns microservices introduce like discovery and routing so you can focus on your core business logic.

What is JHipster?

JHipster (for Java Hipster) is an Open Source application generator, based on Yeoman. It generates a Spring Boot (that's the Java part) and AngularJS (that's the hipster part) application, with tooling and configuration all set up for you. In this post, you’ll learn how you can use JHipster to generate a microservices stack to address design concerns like service registration, configuration and client side routing. Developers use JHipster to get their project started very quickly, with a full-stack application ready to run in production within a few minutes.

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