Container-Ready Rails 5

Rails 5 will be the easiest release ever to get running on Heroku. You can get it going in just five lines:

$ rails new myapp -d postgresql $ cd myapp $ git init . ; git add . ; git commit -m first $ heroku create $ git push heroku master 

These five lines (and a view or two) are all you need to get a Rails 5 app working on Heroku — there are no special gems you need to install, or flags you must toggle. Let's take a peek under the hood, and explore the interfaces baked right into Rails 5 that make it easy to deploy your app on any modern container-based platform.

Production Web Server as the Default

Before Rails 5, the default web server that you get when you run $ rails server is...

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Announcing Heroku Kafka Early Access

Today we are happy to announce early access to Heroku Kafka. We think Kafka is interesting and exciting because it provides a powerful and scalable set of primitives for reasoning about, building, and scaling systems that can handle high volumes and velocities of data. Heroku Kafka makes Kafka more accessible, reliable, and easy to integrate into your applications.

What is Kafka?

Apache Kafka is a distributed commit log for fast, fault-tolerant communication between producers and consumers using message based topics. Kafka provides the messaging backbone for building a new generation of distributed applications capable of handling billions of events and millions of transactions.

At...

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Session Affinity now Generally Available

Today we are announcing that Session Affinity routing is now generally available as a fully supported part of the Heroku Platform. When Session Affinity is enabled for an app, requests from a given browser will always be routed to the same Dyno. Under the hood, the Heroku Router will add a cookie to all incoming requests from new clients; this cookie allows subsequent requests from that client to return to the same Dyno. With specific clients bound to specific Dynos, apps that depend on ‘sticky sessions’ can still take advantage of Heroku’s flexible scaling.

We introduced Session Affinity in Heroku Labs last April. Since then, many customers have built apps with the new routing strategy...

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Bootstrapping Your Microservices Architecture with JHipster and Spring

jhipster-springboot-heroku-01 (1)

Julien Dubois is the lead developer of JHipster, a Yeoman generator for Spring and AngularJS applications. Julien’s here to show how you can use a generator like JHipster to address some of the design concerns microservices introduce like discovery and routing so you can focus on your core business logic.

What is JHipster?

JHipster (for Java Hipster) is an Open Source application generator, based on Yeoman. It generates a Spring Boot (that's the Java part) and AngularJS (that's the hipster part) application, with tooling and configuration all set up for you. In this post, you’ll learn how you can use JHipster to generate a microservices stack to address design concerns like...

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Heroku Review Apps now Generally Available

Today, we are happy to announce the graduation of Heroku Review apps from an exceptionally popular beta to being generally available to all Heroku users.

Review apps are the instant, disposable Heroku app environments that can spin up automatically with each GitHub pull request. They allow developers and their teams to automatically build and test any pull request, updated at every push, at a temporary, shareable URL. When the pull request is closed or merged, the Review app is deleted. GitHub users are notified of all this, right in the pull request web interface.

Heroku Review apps

Instead of speculating on how the code in a pull request might run, you can actually see the code running in a live...

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