All posts tagged with security


Seccomp (short for security computing mode) is a useful feature provided by the Linux kernel since 2.6.12 and is used to control the syscalls made by a process. Seccomp has been implemented by numerous projects such as Docker, Android, OpenSSH and Firefox to name a few.

In this blog post, I am going to show you how you can implement your own seccomp filters, at runtime, for a Go binary on your Dyno.

Why Use Seccomp Filters?

By default, when you run a process on your Dyno, it is limited by which syscalls it can make because the Dyno has been implemented with a restricted set of seccomp filters. This means, for example, that your process has access to syscalls A,B and C and not H and J...

Today we are proud to announce that Heroku has achieved several important compliance milestones that provide third party validation of our security best practices:

  • ISO 27001 Certification: Widely recognized and internationally accepted information security standard that specifies security management best practices and comprehensive security controls following ISO 27002 best practices guidance.
  • ISO 27017 Certification: A standard that provides additional guidance and implementation advice on information security aspects specific to cloud computing.
  • ISO 27018 Certification: Establishes commonly accepted control objectives, controls and guidelines for implementing measures to protect...

The Public Cloud Security (PCS) group at Salesforce partners very closely with Heroku engineering to review and advise on new product features across the platform, from infrastructure to applications. One of the most rewarding aspects about this partnership and working on this team for me is when we not only identify security concerns, but take an active role in building safe solutions.

Heroku recently announced support for Active Storage in Rails 5.2, which introduces the ability to generate previews of PDFs and videos. As a security engineer, hearing about a new feature in a product that automatically parses media files definitely grabbed my attention. This post takes a look at...

At Heroku we consistently monitor vulnerability feeds for new issues. Once a new vulnerability drops, we jump into action to triage and determine how our platform and customers may be affected. Part of this process involves evaluating possible attack scenarios not included in the original vulnerability report. We also spend time looking for "adjacent" and similar bugs in other products. The following Ruby vulnerability was identified during this process.

Vulnerability Triage

A vulnerability, CVE-2017-8817, was identified in libcurl. The FTP function contained an out of bounds read when processing wildcards. As soon as the vulnerability was made public, we went through our...

Containers, specifically Docker, are all the rage. Most DevOps setups feature Docker somewhere in the CI pipeline. This likely means that any build environment you look at, will be using a container solution such as Docker. These build environments need to take untrusted user-supplied code and execute it. It makes sense to try and securely containerize this to minimize risk.

In this post, we’re going to explore how a small misconfiguration in a build environment can create a severe security risk.

It's important to note that this post does not describe any inherent vulnerability in Heroku, Docker, AWS CodeBuild, or containers in general, but discusses a misconfiguration issue that was...

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