All posts tagged with ruby


This blog post is adapted from a talk given by Amy Unger at RailsConf 2018 titled "Knobs, buttons & switches: Operating your application at scale."

We've all seen applications that keel over when a single, upstream service goes down. Despite our best intentions, sometimes an unexpected outage has us scrambling to make repairs. In this blog post, we'll take a look at some tools you can integrate into your application before disaster strikes. We'll talk about seven strategies that can help you shed load, fail gracefully, and protect struggling services. We'll also talk about the technical implementations of these techniques—particularly in Ruby, though the...

Debugging is an important skill to develop as you work your way up to more complex projects. Seasoned engineers have a sixth sense for squashing bugs and have built up an impressive collection of tools that help them diagnose and fix bugs.

I'm a member of Heroku’s Ruby team and creator of CodeTriage and today we’ll look at the tools that I used on a journey to fix a gnarly bug in Sprockets. Sprockets is an asset packaging system written in Ruby that lies at the heart of Rails’ asset processing pipeline.

At the end of the post, you will know how Sprockets works and how to debug in Ruby.

Unexpected Behavior in Sprockets

Sprockets gives developers a convenient way to compile, minify,...

ruby-2

The Ruby committers have again continued their annual holiday tradition of gifting us a new Ruby version: Ruby 2.6 was released today, including the long awaited Just-In-Time (JIT) compiler that the Ruby team has been working on for more than a year.

Just-In-Time compilation requires Ruby to spin up a compiler process on startup, and we're proud to say that this feature is supported today on Heroku thanks to the diligent efforts of our very own Richard Schneeman. We'd also like to thank fellow Herokai Nobuyoshi Nakada for his effort making sure the new JIT works well with all of the officially supported compilers: GCC, Clang and Microsoft Visual C++.

Using Ruby 2.6 on Heroku

...

Rails applications that use ActiveRecord objects in their cache may experience an issue where the entries cannot be invalidated if all of these conditions are true:

  1. They are using Rails 5.2+
  2. They have configured config.active_record.cache_versioning = true
  3. They are using a cache that is not maintained by Rails, such as dalli_store (2.7.8 or prior)

In this post, we discuss the background to a change in the way that cache keys work with Rails, why this change introduced an API incompatibility with 3rd party cache stores, and finally how you can find out if your app is at risk and how to fix it.

Even if you're not at Rails 5.2 yet, you'll likely get there one day. It's...

All previously released versions of Sprockets, the software that powers the Rails asset pipeline, contain a directory traversal vulnerability. This vulnerability has been assigned CVE-2018-3760.

How do I know if I'm affected?

Rails applications are vulnerable if they have this setting enabled in their application:

# config/environments/production.rb config.assets.compile = true # setting to true makes your app vulnerable 

Note: The default value of this setting that ships with Rails in production.rb is false. By default, Rails apps running in production mode are not vulnerable to this exploit.

How do I fix it?

To remediate this vulnerability, applications can either change the...

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