How Combatant Gentlemen Solved Service Discovery Using Heroku Private Spaces

Scott Raio is Co-Founder and CTO of Combatant Gentlemen, a design-to-delivery menswear e-commerce brand. Read our Combatant Gentlemen customer story to learn more about how Heroku helped them build a successful online business.

What microservices are you running in Heroku Private Spaces?

We’ve written an individual service for every business use case. For example, we have services for order processing, product catalog, account management, authentication, swatch display, POs, logistics, payments, etc.

With all these different services, we chose Heroku Private Spaces as a way to make service discovery easier. We’re currently running about 25 services, which is a relatively small number compared to Netflix or Twitter (who employ hundreds of services). But we’re growing, and we’re always evaluating our services to determine which ones are too large and need to be broken out.

Most of our services work autonomously and share nothing between them. When the services are isolated and containerized, then changes are much simpler. It’s a very clean approach.

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Where Will Ruby Go Now? Talking with Tenderlove at RailsConf

DSCF4286 Last week at RailsConf in Kansas City, Terence Lee and Richard Schneeman of Heroku’s Ruby Task Force sat down with the legendary Aaron Patterson (AKA tenderlove).

Aaron has been working hard to make Ruby three times faster — a goal that Matz called Ruby 3x3. Along the way, Aaron has discovered that Ruby may face a hard decision. On one side, Ruby can continue to be the productive, general-purpose scripting language that it looks like today. But the other side of Ruby is that it’s used to run long-running processes in Rails applications, pushing it to be more performant, strongly-typed, and memory-heavy. Ruby can't prioritize both.

To find out where Aaron thinks Ruby’s going, you can read the abridged transcript below the fold — but to hear all about his new job at Github, Ruby performance, mechanical keyboards, grumpy cats, and more, you should listen to the whole recording right here.

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Real-Time Rails: Implementing WebSockets in Rails 5 with Action Cable

It's been one year since Action Cable debuted at RailsConf 2015, and Sophie DeBenedetto is here to answer the question in the minds of many developers: what is it really like to implement "the highlight of Rails 5"? Sophie is a web developer and an instructor at the Flatiron School. Her first love is Ruby on Rails, although she has developed projects with and written about Rails, Ember and Phoenix.


Recent years have seen the rise of "the real-time web." Web apps we use every day rely on real-time features—the sort of features that let you see new posts magically appearing at the top of your feeds without having to lift a finger.

While we may take those features for granted, they represent a significant departure from the HTTP protocol's strict request-response pattern. Real-time web, by contrast, loosely describes a system in which users receive new information from the server as soon as it is available—no request required.

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Container-Ready Rails 5

Rails 5 will be the easiest release ever to get running on Heroku. You can get it going in just five lines:

$ rails new myapp -d postgresql
$ cd myapp
$ git init . ; git add . ; git commit -m first
$ heroku create
$ git push heroku master

These five lines (and a view or two) are all you need to get a Rails 5 app working on Heroku — there are no special gems you need to install, or flags you must toggle. Let's take a peek under the hood, and explore the interfaces baked right into Rails 5 that make it easy to deploy your app on any modern container-based platform.

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Cyber Monday, No Sweat: Why Sweet Tooth Chose PaaS

We recently sat down for a chat with Bill Curtis, a co-founder and the CTO of Sweet Tooth, a points and rewards app for online stores worldwide.

What has been your greatest challenge?

We’re serving way more data today than we ever have, so scaling is mission-critical. In the past, we’ve struggled with traffic spikes. For example, there are seasonal spikes, like Black Friday or Cyber Monday. There are also spikes from merchant activity, such as load testing stores or importing a large number of orders.

I recently tweeted our requests-per-hour graph. It showed that during the huge spikes for this year’s Black Friday and Cyber Monday, our product availability was seamless on Heroku. That would not have been the case on our old infrastructure.

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