All posts tagged with ruby


At Heroku we consistently monitor vulnerability feeds for new issues. Once a new vulnerability drops, we jump into action to triage and determine how our platform and customers may be affected. Part of this process involves evaluating possible attack scenarios not included in the original vulnerability report. We also spend time looking for "adjacent" and similar bugs in other products. The following Ruby vulnerability was identified during this process.

Vulnerability Triage

A vulnerability, CVE-2017-8817, was identified in libcurl. The FTP function contained an out of bounds read when processing wildcards. As soon as the vulnerability was made public, we went through our...

Jekyll, the static website generator written in Ruby and popularized by GitHub, is a great candidate for being run on Heroku. Originally built to run on GitHub Pages, running Jekyll on Heroku allows you to take advantage of Jekyll’s powerful plugin system to do more than convert Markdown to HTML. On my blog, I have plugins to download my Goodreads current and recently read books and to generate Open Graph images for posts. That said, it’s not straightforward to get up and running on Heroku without using jekyll serve to do the heavy lifting. jekyll serve uses Ruby’s built-in, single threaded web server WEBrick, but a public site should be using a web server more suited for production, like...

Over the past decade, millions of developers have interacted with the Heroku CLI. In those 10 years, the CLI has gone through many changes. We've changed languages several times; redesigned the plugin architecture; and improved test coverage and the test framework. What follows is the story of our team's journey to build and maintain the Heroku CLI from the early days of Heroku to today.

  1. Ruby (CLI v1-v3)
  2. Go/Node (CLI v4)
  3. Go/Node (CLI v5)
  4. Pure Node (CLI v6)
  5. What's Next?

Ruby (CLI v1-v3)

Our original CLI (v1-v3) was written in Ruby and served us well for many years. Ruby is a great, expressive language for building CLIs, however, we started experiencing enough problems that...

I recently demonstrated how you can use Rack Mini Profiler to find and fix slow queries. It’s a valuable tool for well-trafficked pages, but sometimes the slowdown is happening on a page you don't visit often, or in a worker task that isn't visible via Rack Mini Profiler. How can you find and fix those slow queries?

Heroku has a feature called expensive queries that can help you out. It shows historical performance data about the queries running on your database: most time consuming, most frequently invoked, slowest execution time, and slowest I/O.

expensive_queries

Recently, I used this feature to identify and address some slow queries for a site I run on Heroku named CodeTriage (the best way to...

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