Posts by Michael Friis

Docker support updates: Local data stores and more languages

Today we're releasing some exciting improvements to the Heroku beta Docker support announced 3 months ago: Automatic configuration of local containers running data stores (like Postgres, Redis and MongoDB) and support for many more languages including images for Node.js, Ruby, Go, Java, Scala, Clojure and Gradle. This helps you use local containers to run, test and deploy Heroku apps that have complex service dependencies with minimal setup and configuration.

Heroku Docker support brings to your machine the Linux containerization technology that we have operated for many years. These local Docker containers make on-boarding, development and testing of apps simpler and faster, and with...

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Heroku Button for Private Repos

Last year, we launched Heroku Button to make it simple for developers to deploy open source code to new Heroku apps. Open source contributors can add Heroku Buttons to GitHub READMEs, tutorials and blog posts and make their projects instantly deployable to Heroku, as apps fully provisioned with add-ons and other required configurations. Two months ago we introduced Elements where more than 1700 public Heroku Buttons are profiled alongside add-ons and top buildpacks.

Today, we're happy to announce Heroku Buttons for projects maintained by your team in private GitHub repos. This new feature uses Heroku's GitHub integration to securely deploy code referenced by buttons on private...

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Heroku Review Apps Beta

Today we’re announcing a feature that is going to change the way teams test and evaluate code changes. Continuous delivery works best when all team members — designers and testers included — can efficiently visualize and review the result of proposed changes. With Review Apps enabled, Heroku will spin up temporary test apps for every pull request that’s opened on GitHub, complete with fresh add-ons and other config required to make the app run. Instead of relying only on code reviews and unit tests run by CI, teams can use Review Apps to immediately try out and debug code branches in a production-like environment on Heroku. Review apps speed up team decision-making so that you can deliver...

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Introducing 'heroku docker:release': Build & Deploy Heroku Apps with Docker

Important update

We've recently made some big updates to our support for Docker and the feature described in this blog post has been deprecated. Learn more in the container registry and runtime dev center documentation.

When Heroku launched the Cedar container stack 4 years ago, we became one of the first companies to use Linux Containers (LXC) to create a secure, performant and scalable cloud platform. Heroku has been a leader in the containerization movement, and we’ve spent years hardening, honing and evolving our runtime container stack. This means that developers can git push apps written in their favorite language and Heroku will build containers that are deployed to a...

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Ship Code Faster: Announcing GitHub Integration GA

Today we’re announcing the general availability of GitHub integration for Heroku. When enabled, GitHub pushes are deployed immediately to linked Heroku apps. This is a big step forward for people working on apps with source managed on GitHub and deployed to Heroku. The integration has been in beta in Heroku Dashboard for a while, and we’ve seen great adoption and positive feedback.

When a GitHub repo is connected to a Heroku app, you can either manually deploy branches from the repo, or you can configure a particular branch to auto-deploy to the app on every GitHub push. With auto-deploys enabled, you no longer have to maintain a separate heroku Git remote: Simply push to GitHub and...

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Update Git clients on Windows and OS X

Last week, a security fix was released for Git. The fix patches a bug in the Git client that is exploitable on operating systems with case insensitive file systems such as Windows and OS X.

Heroku has updated the Git installer that we ship with Toolbelt for Windows. We have also removed an old Git version from the OS X installer (it was not generally used).

In addition, we’ve added a Git version warning in Toolbelt that will prompt you to update Git if you’re using a vulnerable version on Windows (shown here) or OS X:

$ heroku apps WARNING: Your version of git is 1.9.3. Which has serious security vulnerabilities. More information here:...

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HTTP Git now Generally Available

Today we’re happy to announce that the HTTP Git beta is over and that HTTP Git is fully ready for production.

The beta was launched less than a month ago and we are already handling thousands of HTTP Git builds per day. In addition, HTTP Git powers the Dropbox Sync beta, making sure that Dropbox folders and Heroku repos are up-to-date.

Over the past month, we have seen great adoption from partners, and Travis CI is using HTTP Git as the default git strategy for Heroku deployments.

We encountered few issues during the beta, and we’re confident that HTTP Git is the best Git implementation for most Heroku users. For that reason, we’re making HTTP Git the default setup when repos are...

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Announcing Beta Dropbox Sync

Helping teams to collaborate on creating, shipping and operating great apps is a core Heroku value. People collaborating on Heroku apps are not all alike: Some spend all day in the terminal, others prefer using Heroku from a browser. That’s why we’ve built both a powerful CLI and a great Dashboard.

Today, we’re adding beta support for Dropbox Sync to complement Git-based deployments. By adding Dropbox as a way to sync changes, we’re making it easier for more users on diverse teams to contribute to apps built on Heroku.

Git is a powerful tool for software developers to collaborate on building great apps and software. We added Git-based deployments 6 years ago, to plug Heroku straight into...

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Announcing HTTP Git Beta

Of the many Platform-as-a-Service innovations Heroku has contributed in its seven year existence, perhaps the most iconic is git push heroku master. Today we’re announcing a significant upgrade to Heroku’s Git implementation: Beta support for Git’s HTTP transport.

HTTP Git has some notable advantages over traditional SSH Git. Instead of relying on port 22 (often blocked by firewalls) HTTP Git runs on port 443, the same port used for secure web requests.

Also, HTTP Git uses a simpler authentication model than SSH Git, and is easier to set up. Many new users struggle with the tooling and configuration required to configure git-push over SSH, especially on Windows. HTTP Git uses Heroku API...

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Cedar-14 now Generally Available

We’re excited to announce that the Cedar-14 – the new version of the Celedon Cedar stack – is ready for general availability and is now the default stack on Heroku. Cedar-14 is based on the latest Ubuntu LTS Linux version and comes with a modern set of libraries and system dependencies that will stay current and updated for a long time to come.

Since we announced the public beta of Cedar-14 three months ago, we have migrated most of the apps that we run on Heroku to Cedar-14 (yes, a lot of Heroku runs on the Heroku platform) and thousands of users have also moved apps or created new Cedar-14 apps. We have worked with these early adopters and with buildpack maintainers to weed out bugs and...

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Try the new Uber API on Heroku

Uber logo

On Wednesday, Uber launched an API to let developers build new products and services that leverage the Uber ridesharing platform. Uber built a simple Python/Flask app that developers can use when exploring how the API works.

This is the sort of experimentation and innovation that we at Heroku want to enable, so we sent a pull request to add an app.json file to the repo and a Heroku Button to the readme.

To deploy the Uber sample on Heroku and experiment with the new Uber API, simply register on the Uber developer site and then click the button below:

Deploy on Heroku

Once the app has been set up on Heroku, you’ll have to go back to the Uber developer site and configure the redirect URI to the URI for...

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Cedar-14 Public Beta

At Heroku, we want to give our users access to the latest and greatest software stacks to base their apps on. That’s why we continuously update buildpacks to support new language and framework versions and let users experiment further using third-party buildpacks.

Sitting underneath slugs and buildpacks are stacks. Stacks are the operating system and system libraries required to make apps run. Today we’re releasing into public beta a new version of the Celedon Cedar stack: cedar-14.

cedar-14 is built on the latest LTS version of Ubuntu Linux and has recent versions of libraries and system dependencies that will receive maintenance and security updates for a long time to come.


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Introducing Heroku Button

At Heroku, we want to make the process of deploying, running and updating code simple and easy. To that end, we’re launching the Heroku Button: a simple HTML or Markdown snippet that can be added to READMEs, blog posts and other places where code lives. Clicking a Heroku Button will take you through a guided process to configure and deploy an app running the source code referenced by the button.

The best way to understand the Heroku Button is to try one. Click the example button below to deploy a Node.js sample project to an app running on your Heroku account:

Deploy on Heroku

How it works

When you see a Heroku Button in a README, in documentation or in a blog post, then this is a piece of code that’s...

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Introducing programmatic builds on Heroku

Today, we are announcing an important addition to the Heroku Platform API: The /apps/:app/builds endpoint. This endpoint exposes the Heroku slug compilation process as a simple API primitive. You can use the endpoint to turn any publicly hosted source-tarball into a slug running on a Heroku app in seconds.

Here’s output from a Go program that invokes the new endpoint:

$ ./build -app limitless-fjord-5604 -archive ......... -----> Node.js app detected -----> Requested node range: 0.10.x -----> Resolved node version: 0.10.28 -----> Downloading and installing node … $ curl

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Heroku Platform API now GA

Today, we’re happy to announce General Availability of the Heroku Platform API. Heroku is a platform built by developers, for developers. As developers, we understand the utility of APIs and the power APIs give to speed up and script error-prone manual processes or to combine other services with Heroku into new and exciting products. With the Platform API, you now have a fully documented and supported way to instrument and automate Heroku.

Platform API

Designing and implementing this API has been an important process for Heroku internally: It has forced us rethink how different platform components are factored and how they should be exposed in a clean and coherent manner. We are already using the...

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Two-factor Auth in Public Beta

Today, we’re excited to announce public beta of two-factor authentication for Heroku accounts. With two-factor auth enabled, an authentication code is required whenever you log in. The code is delivered using an app on your smartphone, and access to your phone becomes a required factor (in addition to your password) to access Heroku. An attacker that has somehow discovered your password will not be able to log in using just your password.

Enabling two-factor auth

The easiest way to enable two-factor auth is using Dashboard. Go to your account page, click the “Enable two-factor authentication” button and follow the on-screen instructions.

Enable two-factor auth button

Download an authenticator app for your...

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JSON Schema for the Heroku Platform API

Today we’re making an important piece of Platform API tooling available: A machine-readable JSON schema that describes what resources are available via the API, what their URLs are, how they are represented and what operations they support. The schema opens up many interesting use cases, both for users and for us at Heroku working on improving and extending the API. A few examples are:

  • Auto-creating client libraries for your favorite programming language
  • Generating up-to-date reference docs
  • Writing automatic acceptance and integration tests

We are already using the schema to maintain the API reference documentation on Dev Center and to generate several v3 client libraries:

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Programmatically release code to Heroku

Currently in beta, the Heroku Platform API lets developers automate, extend and combine the Heroku platform with other services in a programmatic, self-service way. Today we are setting the capstone into the API by adding slug and release endpoints to the API beta.

These API endpoints are special. They expose a very core part of what Heroku does best: Quickly and safely releasing new versions of an app onto the Heroku platform.

Using the new slug and release endpoints, platform developers can build integrations and services that completely sidestep the traditional Heroku Git deployment flow. So instead of requiring git push heroku master to deploy, it’s now possible to do things like:

  • ...

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OAuth for Platform API in Public Beta

In May, we launched the beta Heroku Platform API - making it possible to automate, extend and combine the Heroku platform with other services in a programmatic, self-service way. As of today, OAuth 2.0 support for the Platform API is available in public beta.

With OAuth support, developers building integrations and services that use the Heroku API can provide a much better experience to their users. Instead of requesting full access to user accounts, access requests can be scoped to just the information and control a service needs. Instead of using one API key for all third-party services, users can check and revoke authorizations on a case-by-case basis. And users can manage all of...

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Heroku Labs: Managing App Deployment with Pipelines

Editor's Note: The version of Pipelines described in this blog post has been deprecated and replaced by a new non-labs implementation. Features added through Heroku Labs are experimental and may change or be removed without notice.

heroku fork lets you create unique, running instances of existing applications in a single command, making it fast and simple to set up homogenous development, staging and production environments. But have you ever wished you could deploy directly from staging to a production app after testing and validation?

Heroku pipelines, now an experimental feature available in Heroku Labs, lets you define the relationship between apps and easily promote a slug from...

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New Dyno Networking Model

Today we're announcing a change to how networking on Heroku works. Dynos now get a dedicated, virtual networking interface instead of sharing a network interface with other dynos. This makes dynos behave more like standard unix containers resulting in better compatibility with application frameworks and better parity between development and production environments.


Previously, network interfaces were shared between multiple dynos. This weakened the abstraction of a dyno as a standard Unix-style container with a network interface of its own and full disposal of the whole TCP port range.

The shared network interface also resulted in a low grade information leak where one...

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