As part of our Blackhat Europe talk “Reverse Engineering and Exploiting Builds in the Cloud” we publicly released a new tool called Terrier.

Announcing Terrier: An open-source tool for identifying and analysing container and image components.

In this blog post, I am going to show you how Terrier can help you identify and verify container and image components for a wide variety of use-cases, be it from a supply-chain perspective or forensics perspective. Terrier can be found on Github ...


Seccomp (short for security computing mode) is a useful feature provided by the Linux kernel since 2.6.12 and is used to control the syscalls made by a process. Seccomp has been implemented by numerous projects such as Docker, Android, OpenSSH and Firefox to name a few.

In this blog post, I am going to show you how you can implement your own seccomp filters, at runtime, for a Go binary on your Dyno.

Why Use Seccomp Filters?

By default, when you run a process on your Dyno, it is limited by which syscalls it can make because the Dyno has been implemented with a restricted set of seccomp filters. This means, for example, that your process has access to syscalls A,B and C and not H and J...


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