Today we are announcing the general availability of Salesforce1 Heroku Connect. This new Heroku product is a synchronization service, conceptually similar to Dropbox or iCloud, that synchronizes data between a Salesforce deployment and a Heroku Postgres database. By bringing together the data layers of the Force.com and Heroku platforms--and thus allowing the same data to be seamlessly reflected in each cloud’s native database--you can use the capabilities of each platform together in a single application, without having to translate or otherwise integrate between them.

Heroku + Force.com

Heroku and Force.com are cloud platform ‘cousins’, each with its own semantics and high-level...


As a service provider, when things go wrong you try to get them fixed as quickly as possible. In addition to technical troubleshooting, there’s a lot of coordination and communication that needs to happen in resolving issues with systems like Heroku’s.

At Heroku we’ve codified our practices around these aspects into an incident response framework. Whether you’re just interested in how incident response works at Heroku, or looking to adopt and apply some of these practices for yourself, we hope you find this inside look helpful.

Incident Response and the Incident Commander Role

We describe Heroku’s incident response framework below. It’s based on the Incident Command System used in...


Today, we’re excited to announce public beta of two-factor authentication for Heroku accounts. With two-factor auth enabled, an authentication code is required whenever you log in. The code is delivered using an app on your smartphone, and access to your phone becomes a required factor (in addition to your password) to access Heroku. An attacker that has somehow discovered your password will not be able to log in using just your password.

Enabling two-factor auth

The easiest way to enable two-factor auth is using Dashboard. Go to your account page, click the “Enable two-factor authentication” button and follow the on-screen instructions.

Enable two-factor auth button

Download an authenticator app for your...


PHP developers are makers at heart. The core strength of PHP has always been in creating a tight feedback cycle between developers and their audiences. That strength is the reason why PHP powers so many of the world’s biggest and best web properties such as Facebook and Etsy. But as developers of those and similar apps know, PHP hasn’t always enjoyed some of the runtime, management or infrastructure elements its peer communities like Ruby on Rails, Python with Django, and Node have had for some time.

As one of the web’s largest PHP shops, Facebook has been an advocate and innovator for the language, but it’s been hard for PHP developers beyond Facebook’s walls to take advantage of that...


The history of PHP is the history of the web. Long-time developers will remember how PHP changed the universe of web development. PHP brought two key innovations to the table when it first launched. First, it was interpreted, which meant you could edit a file in place, then refresh the page and see the result. This quick feedback loop was why so many started with PHP and is still a cornerstone of what makes the language so useful. Second, it was the first widespread templating language which enabled intermixing of HTML and PHP code. Every other major web language and framework since PHP has followed suit.

Over time, PHP became a cornerstone of the “LAMP stack”. The LAMP stack consisted of...


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