Today we’re pleased to announce general availability of Heroku Redis with a number of new features and a more robust developer experience. By giving developers a different data management primitive, we’re helping them meet the needs of building modern, scalable applications. The classic example of using multiple data stores in an application is the e-commerce site that stores its valuable financial information in a relational database while the user session tokens are saved in a key-value store like Redis. This is one of the use cases where Redis has proven to be instrumental in solving problems like caching, queuing and session storage, just to name a few.

In addition to making Heroku...


Today we are announcing that Heroku’s new dynos are generally available. This new suite of dynos gives you an expanded set of options and prices when it comes to building apps at any scale on Heroku, no matter whether you’re preparing for traffic from Black Friday shoppers or deploying your first lines of code. Thanks to everyone who participated in the beta and provided feedback and bug reports.

What does this mean for you? Beginning today, all new applications will run using these new dynos. You can migrate your existing paid applications to the new dynos at any convenient time until January 31, 2016, when we will sunset the traditional dynos. We will begin migrating free applications...


Last year, we launched Heroku Button to make it simple for developers to deploy open source code to new Heroku apps. Open source contributors can add Heroku Buttons to GitHub READMEs, tutorials and blog posts and make their projects instantly deployable to Heroku, as apps fully provisioned with add-ons and other required configurations. Two months ago we introduced Elements where more than 1700 public Heroku Buttons are profiled alongside add-ons and top buildpacks.

Today, we're happy to announce Heroku Buttons for projects maintained by your team in private GitHub repos. This new feature uses Heroku's GitHub integration to securely deploy code referenced by buttons on private...


1995 was the year AOL floppy disks arrived in the mail, Netscape Navigator was born and the first public version of Java was released. Over the next two decades, Java witnessed the multi-core revolution, the birth of the cloud, and the rise of polyglot programming. It survived these upheavals by evolving with them, and it continues to evolve even as we celebrate Java's twentieth birthday this year.

But the JVM turning twenty doesn’t make it out-of-date. On the contrary, Java's evolution has lead to a kind of renaissance. That's why we sat down with RedMonk earlier this month to discuss Java's past, present, and future on the Opinionated Infrastructure Podcast. Our...


Today we’re announcing a feature that is going to change the way teams test and evaluate code changes. Continuous delivery works best when all team members — designers and testers included — can efficiently visualize and review the result of proposed changes. With Review Apps enabled, Heroku will spin up temporary test apps for every pull request that’s opened on GitHub, complete with fresh add-ons and other config required to make the app run. Instead of relying only on code reviews and unit tests run by CI, teams can use Review Apps to immediately try out and debug code branches in a production-like environment on Heroku. Review apps speed up team decision-making so that you can deliver...


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