See Python, See Python Go, Go Python Go

Andrey Petrov is the author of urllib3, the creator of Briefmetrics and ssh-chat, and a former Googler and YCombinator alum. He’s here to tell us of a dangerous expedition his requests undertook, which sent them from Python, through the land of C, to a place called Go (and back again).

Today we're going to make a Python library that is actually the Go webserver, for which we can write handlers in Python. It makes Python servers really fast, and—more importantly—it’s a bit fun and experimental. This post is a more detailed overview of my PyCon 2016 talk of the same title. If you'd like to play along at home, this code was written in Go 1.6 and Python 3.5 and the entire complete working thing is open source (MIT license) and and it's available to clone and fork here.

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Finally, Real-Time Django Is Here: Get Started with Django Channels

Django Channel header

Today, we're thrilled to host Jacob Kaplan-Moss. Jacob's a former Herokai and long-time core contributor to Django, and he's here to share an in-depth look at something that he believes will define the future of the framework.

When Django was created, over ten years ago, the web was a less complicated place. The majority of web pages were static. Database-backed, Model/View/Controller-style web apps were the new spiffy thing. Ajax was barely starting to be used, and only in narrow contexts.

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Django 1.9's Improvements for Postgres

A big update to the beloved Python web framework known as Django was released recently: Django 1.9. This release contains a long list of improvements for everything from the graphical styling of the admin to the ability to run your test suite in parallel.

Our favorite improvements to the framework were, of course, all about our favorite database: Postgres. Here are some of the highlights from the official release notes (highly recommended reading).

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Waza 2013: How Ecosystems Build Mastery

When we think of the concept of Waza (技) or "art and technique," it's easy to get caught up in the idea of individual mastery. It's true that works of art are often created by those with great skill, but acquiring that skill is neither solitary nor static. Generations of masters contribute to a canon and it is in that spirit that we built the Heroku platform and the Waza event. This year's Waza was no exception.

On February 28th, more than 900 attendees participated in Waza including Ruby founder Yukihiro "Matz" Matsumoto, Django co-creator Jacob Kaplan-Moss and Codeacademy’s Linda Liukas. True to form, we offered you a platform for experimentation and you surprised us with your contributions.

From your origami creations, to your Arduino hacks, to the technical conversations over craft beer -- you taught us that the definition of software development is ever-evolving. Thank you for allowing us to help you change lives and push boundaries. We will continue our commitment to growing the platform for you and look forward to collaborating with you in the future.

For more event highlights visit the Waza videos and photos. To learn more about Heroku, add yourself to our mailing list.

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