All posts tagged with node


There are always challenges when it comes to debugging applications. Node.js' asynchronous workflows add an extra layer of complexity to this arduous process. Although there have been some updates made to the V8 engine in order to easily access asynchronous stack traces, most of the time, we just get errors on the main thread of our applications, which makes debugging a little bit difficult. As well, when our Node.js applications crash, we usually need to rely on some complicated CLI tooling to analyze the core dumps.

The recent introduction of Platform Events and Change Data Capture (CDC) in Salesforce has launched us into a new age of integration capabilities. Today, it's possible to develop custom apps that respond to activity in Salesforce. Whether you're creating a memorable customer interaction or implementing an internal workflow for employees, consider an event-sourced design to improve responsiveness and durability of the app.

In this article, we'll look at an event-sourced app architecture that consumes the Salesforce Streaming API using the elegant jsforce JavaScript library in a Node app on Heroku.

Streaming with jsforce

In summer 2018, the open-source jsforce library...

Over the past decade, millions of developers have interacted with the Heroku CLI. In those 10 years, the CLI has gone through many changes. We've changed languages several times; redesigned the plugin architecture; and improved test coverage and the test framework. What follows is the story of our team's journey to build and maintain the Heroku CLI from the early days of Heroku to today.

  1. Ruby (CLI v1-v3)
  2. Go/Node (CLI v4)
  3. Go/Node (CLI v5)
  4. Pure Node (CLI v6)
  5. What's Next?

Ruby (CLI v1-v3)

Our original CLI (v1-v3) was written in Ruby and served us well for many years. Ruby is a great, expressive language for building CLIs, however, we started experiencing enough problems that...

It’s been a little over a year since our last Happy Node Hackers post, and even in such a short time much has changed and some powerful new tools have been released. The Node.js ecosystem continues to mature and new best practices have emerged.

Here are 8 habits for happy Node hackers updated for 2017. They're specifically for app developers, rather than module authors, since those groups have different goals and constraints:

Choices are an important part of a healthy open source software community. That’s why we’re excited about Yarn, a new package manager that addresses many of the problems with Node’s default package manager, npm. While npm has done a fantastic job creating a large and vibrant JavaScript ecosystem, I want to share why Yarn is an important addition to the Node.js ecosystem, how it will improve your Node.js development experience, and how Heroku has incorporated it into the build process for your Heroku apps.

Yarn Logo

We began testing Yarn almost immediately after it was released, and began fully supporting it on December 16.

About Yarn

Yarn was released in October 2016 and made a big splash...

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