All posts tagged with javascript


In the early years of web development, there were three standard fundamentals upon which every website was built: HTML, CSS, and JavaScript. As time passed, web developers became more proficient in their construction of fancy UI/UX widgets for websites. With the need for newer ways of crafting a site coming in conflict with the relatively slow adoption of newer standards, more and more developers began to build their own libraries to abstract away some of the technical details. The web ceased being a standard: now your website could be a React site, or an Angular site, or a Vue site, or any number of other web framework that are not interoperable with each other.

Web components seek to...

Editor's note: If you like CLIs, you should check out oclifconf taking place on Friday, May 31st in San Francisco. It’s the first community get-together for oclif! Space is limited so let us know soon if you are interested in joining.

What is it that makes working from the command line so empowering? It can feel archaic at times, sure, but when you remember the right sequence of words, characters, and symbols for what you’re trying to do, it hits you with a sense of accomplishment and mastery over your tools that no graphical interface can compete with.

So what better way to continue your adventures as a developer than by developing your own CLI tool?

In this post, we’ll go over what...

An image showing what installing a progressive web app might look like.

Progressive web apps enable websites to function more like native mobile apps in exchange for some flexibility. You get native mobile app functionality (or close to it) without all the overhead of app store approvals and tons of platform-specific native code. Users can install a progressive web app to their home screen and launch it just like a native app. However, the app is launched into a pseudo-app frame that has some restrictions and only allows access to pages that are sub-paths of the initial path of the...

It’s been a little over a year since our last Happy Node Hackers post, and even in such a short time much has changed and some powerful new tools have been released. The Node.js ecosystem continues to mature and new best practices have emerged.

Here are 8 habits for happy Node hackers updated for 2017. They're specifically for app developers, rather than module authors, since those groups have different goals and constraints:

This is the second of a two-part transcript from a recent interview with Tom Dale of Ember.js. In part one we discussed the history and direction of the Ember.js project. Continuing the discussion of the future for Ember.js, this post includes the rest of the interview, primarily focused on the Glimmer.js project. Some of the questions were omitted from these transcriptions for brevity, so we’re also releasing the nearly hour long audio file of the entire interview. Enjoy!

Jonan: Let’s talk about Glimmer 2. If I understand correctly it's released now and it entirely supplants Ember. So how are you planning to gracefully sunset the project?

Terence: I think locks (Ricardo Mendes)...

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