All posts tagged with javascript


There are always challenges when it comes to debugging applications. Node.js' asynchronous workflows add an extra layer of complexity to this arduous process. Although there have been some updates made to the V8 engine in order to easily access asynchronous stack traces, most of the time, we just get errors on the main thread of our applications, which makes debugging a little bit difficult. As well, when our Node.js applications crash, we usually need to rely on some complicated CLI tooling to analyze the core dumps.

Over the last few years, GraphQL has emerged as a very popular API specification that focuses on making data fetching easier for clients, whether the clients are a front-end or a third-party.

In a traditional REST-based API approach, the client makes a request, and the server dictates the response:

$ curl https://api.heroku.space/users/1 { "id": 1, "name": "Luke", "email": "luke@heroku.space", "addresses": [ { "street": "1234 Rodeo Drive", "city": "Los Angeles", "country": "USA" } ] } 

But, in GraphQL, the client determines precisely the data it wants from the server....

In the early years of web development, there were three standard fundamentals upon which every website was built: HTML, CSS, and JavaScript. As time passed, web developers became more proficient in their construction of fancy UI/UX widgets for websites. With the need for newer ways of crafting a site coming in conflict with the relatively slow adoption of newer standards, more and more developers began to build their own libraries to abstract away some of the technical details. The web ceased being a standard: now your website could be a React site, or an Angular site, or a Vue site, or any number of other web framework that are not interoperable with each other.

Web components seek to...

Editor's note: If you like CLIs, you should check out oclifconf taking place on Friday, May 31st in San Francisco. It’s the first community get-together for oclif! Space is limited so let us know soon if you are interested in joining.

What is it that makes working from the command line so empowering? It can feel archaic at times, sure, but when you remember the right sequence of words, characters, and symbols for what you’re trying to do, it hits you with a sense of accomplishment and mastery over your tools that no graphical interface can compete with.

So what better way to continue your adventures as a developer than by developing your own CLI tool?

In this post, we’ll go over what...

An image showing what installing a progressive web app might look like.

Progressive web apps enable websites to function more like native mobile apps in exchange for some flexibility. You get native mobile app functionality (or close to it) without all the overhead of app store approvals and tons of platform-specific native code. Users can install a progressive web app to their home screen and launch it just like a native app. However, the app is launched into a pseudo-app frame that has some restrictions and only allows access to pages that are sub-paths of the initial path of the...

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