Heroku Connect APIs Now GA

Today we’re announcing that the APIs for the Heroku Connect data synchronization service are now GA. These fully supported endpoints will help our users with the tasks they most need repeatable automation for: creating consistent configuration across development, staging, and production environments; managing connections across multiple Salesforce deployments; and integrating Heroku Connect status with their existing operational systems and alerts.

When we first released Heroku Connect, users were delighted with the simple point and click UI: they could suddenly integrate Salesforce data with Heroku Postgres in one enjoyable minute! But as users’ familiarity with the service has grown...

Read more →

Introducing the app.json Application Manifest

Developers want to spend less time setting up applications and start working with the code sooner. Setting up applications is error-prone, time consuming and interruptive to the development flow. Often, there are several steps to go from your code or other samples and templates that you find in repositories online, to a running application that you can continue to work on.

Today, we are excited to introduce the app.json manifest. app.json enables developers to define their applications' details, setup configurations and runtime environments in a structured way. Instead of providing step-by-step instructions, you can now add app.json files to your applications' source code. You...

Read more →

Auto-generating a Go API client for Heroku

Editor's note: This is a cross post from Blake Gentry, an engineer at Heroku.

This is a post about the recently announced Heroku Platform API JSON Schema and how I used that schema to write an auto-generated Go client for the API.

Heroku's API team has spent a large part of the past year designing a new version of the platform API. While this is the 3rd incarnation of the API, neither of the two previous versions were publicly documented. In fact, the only documentation on the old APIs that was ever published is the source code of the Heroku Rubygem, which powers the Heroku Toolbelt. That worked fairly well at the time for Heroku's Ruby-centric audience, but it was never...

Read more →

Heroku API Update

The Heroku API gets a major update today; you can now view and manage all of your application’s settings straight from the command line. New in this version:

  • Manage sharing (add/remove/list collaborators)
  • Manage multiple ssh keys for your user (add/remove/list keys)
  • Update settings (public true/false, mode production/development)
  • Rename an app
  • Run rake tasks remotely

A taste of the new command-line goodness:

adam@kvasir:~$ heroku create gagetron Created http://gagetron.heroku.com/ | git@heroku.com:gagetron.git
adam@kvasir:~$ heroku info gagetron === gagetron Web URL: http://gagetron.heroku.com/ Git Repo: git@heroku.com:gagetron.git Mode: development Public: false Collaborators:...
Read more →

API and External Git Access

Heroku now has an API (accessible from the command line, a Ruby library, or REST calls), revision control on all apps with Git, and remote access to the Git repository.

The combination of these new features means that you can now work on your apps using the local tools you love – like TextMate, vi, or emacs – and still get the benefit of zero-configuration deployment to Heroku.

How does it work? Grab the Heroku gem with “gem install heroku”. A sample work session looks like this:

heroku clone myapp cd myapp ruby script/server …edit locally… git add . git commit -m “local changes” git push

The final step will deploy the app to Heroku,...

Read more →

Browse the blog archives, subscribe to the full-text feed, or visit the engineering blog.